How To Meditate: A Guide For Lawyers (Part I)

How To Meditate: A Guide For Lawyers (Part I)

 

Before I started meditating, I’d open my eyes in the morning and my mind was already going 150 mph. I’d check my email and start the day feeling miles behind. Now, I wake up each day with gratitude because none of us are guaranteed another day. As an aside, research shows that if you spend just 21-days writing down three new things you’re grateful for, you can increase your level of happiness. So, to the extent I have any morning rituals, it’s just that — start with gratitude and commit to fully living each moment.

Meditation allows me to reflect on what my priorities are for the day so that I can focus on it instead of getting bogged down with busy work.

How to Meditate

There are many different types of meditation — insight, mantra, counting, body scan, centering prayer, and Metta or Loving Kindness. In each meditation, you’re intentionally focusing your mind to the object of attention (for example, the breath, mantra, sensations, etc.) This is why meditation increases focus and concentration, because you’re literally training your brain to continually focus on one thing.